Blog

Approaching Marital Communication Problems

by The Studio of Mental Health and Psychology A lack of communication skills is a typical presenting problem of couples. Indeed, problematic receptive and expressive communication skills are highly associated with a source of other common complaints, such as a lack of empathy, insufficient attention to each other, conflict escalation and inability to employ a problem-solving … Continue reading Approaching Marital Communication Problems

Why is ”mutual” partner abuse a myth? 

by The Studio of Mental Health and Psychology Why is ”mutual” intimate partner abuse a myth?  It is simple.  Abuse is essentially about an imbalance of control and power. In an abusive relationship, one partner has more power and control than the other.  Whereas ”mutual” intimate partner abuse is a myth, unhealthy behaviours from both partners may … Continue reading Why is ”mutual” partner abuse a myth? 

Radical Acceptance as a Distress Tolerance Skill

by The Studio of Mental Health and Psychology Do you know what the four DBT problem-solving options are? Solve the problem,Interpret the situation differently,Radically accept the situation,Remain miserable or make the situation worse by acting on your hasty urges. Radical Acceptance is one of the four options for solving a problem and is also one … Continue reading Radical Acceptance as a Distress Tolerance Skill

Delay Discounting at the core of Impulsive Behaviour

By The Studio of Mental Health and Psychology Delay Discounting in Impulsive Behaviour addiction counselling Delay Discounting One of the main features of impulsivity is dysfunctional decision making. In impulsive dysfunctional decision making, immediate rewards (e.g. satisfying effects of alcohol or drug use, avoiding/escaping emotional or physical suffering/pain, anxiety) are preferred over more substantial but … Continue reading Delay Discounting at the core of Impulsive Behaviour

“Having the big five traits of the rich can help you become rich”, a new study says. Test your big five personality traits here.

by The Studio of Mental Health and Psychology Matching the prototypical personality profile of the rich may contribute to a higher chance of becoming rich. A new study shows there is a critical difference between the personality traits of the rich and the rest of the people. Lower Neuroticism, higher Risk Tolerance, Extraversion, Openness and Conscientiousness mark … Continue reading “Having the big five traits of the rich can help you become rich”, a new study says. Test your big five personality traits here.

Did you know that a penny lost is valued more highly than a penny received?

by The Studio of Mental Health and Psychology Did you know that a penny lost is valued more highly than a penny received? Here is why: Research indicates that the effects of a reinforcer and punisher on human behaviour are not equally opposing.   Punishing effects of losses on choice behaviour are 2-3 times more potent than … Continue reading Did you know that a penny lost is valued more highly than a penny received?

Anxiety: Five Major Types of Anxiety Disorders

by The Studio of Mental Health and Psychology Anxiety is a primary emotion that has long been considered an adaptive resource for danger and threats. Charles Darwin maintained that fear reactions are essentially the product of natural selection. Sigmund Freud saw fear and anxiety as aversive and universally experienced emotions distinct from other negative emotions. He … Continue reading Anxiety: Five Major Types of Anxiety Disorders

Cognitive Motivation as a Resource for Depression Treatment

by The Studio of Mental Health and Psychology Depressive symptoms interfere with self-regulating and cognitive abilities. Individuals suffering from depression have to deal with deficient emotion regulation and cognitive control that manifest in rumination and cognitive bias.  Managing the deficits requires cognitive endeavour and motivation. Cognitive motivation has remarkably been found to positively influence emotion regulation … Continue reading Cognitive Motivation as a Resource for Depression Treatment

The Role of Obesity in Cognitive Decline and Alzheimer’s Disease

by The Studio of Mental Health and Psychology Nutrition, lifestyle and insufficient physical activity to control body weight are making the global population more vulnerable to obesity. The obese body abnormally accumulates adipose tissues, including white adipose tissue (WAT), which aberrantly generates and secretes adipokines (substances that exert autocrine, paracrine or endocrine effects on processes in … Continue reading The Role of Obesity in Cognitive Decline and Alzheimer’s Disease

Aerobic Exercise May Reduce Brain Degeneration in Adults with Alzheimer’s Disease

Robust evidence from animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) maintains that aerobic exercise is a modifying treatment for AD. Human research, however, is limited with inconsistent findings. The present study demonstrates that aerobic exercise reduces the progression of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) and may reduce degeneration of the hippocampus in older adults with AD. The … Continue reading Aerobic Exercise May Reduce Brain Degeneration in Adults with Alzheimer’s Disease

Formation of secure attachment in adulthood as a mental health intervention

Formation or regeneration of a sense of security in adults who experienced insecure attachment in childhood enhances resilience and improves psychological wellbeing. An instinctive drive for attachment is our fundamental survival mechanism in early childhood.[1] Attachment behaviour is any action intended for getting a response from a preferred person, someone who is usually wiser or … Continue reading Formation of secure attachment in adulthood as a mental health intervention

Can we outsmart our own cognitive biases?

We are susceptible to cognitive biases, which cause us to overfocus on some kinds of information while disregarding other kinds. These flaws in our thinking can trick us into making wrong conclusions and decisions. Moreover, cognitive biases are highly implicated in the development of mental disorders. For example, attentional bias—hyperattention to a certain category of … Continue reading Can we outsmart our own cognitive biases?