Radical Acceptance as a Distress Tolerance Skill

by The Studio of Mental Health and Psychology Do you know what the four DBT problem-solving options are? Solve the problem,Interpret the situation differently,Radically accept the situation,Remain miserable or make the situation worse by acting on your hasty urges. Radical Acceptance is one of the four options for solving a problem and is also one … Continue reading Radical Acceptance as a Distress Tolerance Skill

Anxiety: Five Major Types of Anxiety Disorders

by The Studio of Mental Health and Psychology Anxiety is a primary emotion that has long been considered an adaptive resource for danger and threats. Charles Darwin maintained that fear reactions are essentially the product of natural selection. Sigmund Freud saw fear and anxiety as aversive and universally experienced emotions distinct from other negative emotions. He … Continue reading Anxiety: Five Major Types of Anxiety Disorders

The Role of Obesity in Cognitive Decline and Alzheimer’s Disease

by The Studio of Mental Health and Psychology Nutrition, lifestyle and insufficient physical activity to control body weight are making the global population more vulnerable to obesity. The obese body abnormally accumulates adipose tissues, including white adipose tissue (WAT), which aberrantly generates and secretes adipokines (substances that exert autocrine, paracrine or endocrine effects on processes in … Continue reading The Role of Obesity in Cognitive Decline and Alzheimer’s Disease

Aerobic Exercise May Reduce Brain Degeneration in Adults with Alzheimer’s Disease

Robust evidence from animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) maintains that aerobic exercise is a modifying treatment for AD. Human research, however, is limited with inconsistent findings. The present study demonstrates that aerobic exercise reduces the progression of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) and may reduce degeneration of the hippocampus in older adults with AD. The … Continue reading Aerobic Exercise May Reduce Brain Degeneration in Adults with Alzheimer’s Disease

Can we outsmart our own cognitive biases?

We are susceptible to cognitive biases, which cause us to overfocus on some kinds of information while disregarding other kinds. These flaws in our thinking can trick us into making wrong conclusions and decisions. Moreover, cognitive biases are highly implicated in the development of mental disorders. For example, attentional bias—hyperattention to a certain category of … Continue reading Can we outsmart our own cognitive biases?