Did you know that a penny lost is valued more highly than a penny received?

Did you know that a penny lost is valued more highly than a penny received? Here is why: Research indicates that the effects of a reinforcer and punisher on human behaviour are not equally opposing.   Punishing effects of losses on choice behaviour are 2-3 times more potent than the reinforcing impacts of earnings.  It appears … Continue reading Did you know that a penny lost is valued more highly than a penny received?

The Role of Obesity in Cognitive Decline and Alzheimer’s Disease

Nutrition, lifestyle and insufficient physical activity to control body weight are making the global population more vulnerable to obesity. The obese body abnormally accumulates adipose tissues, including white adipose tissue (WAT), which aberrantly generates and secretes adipokines (substances that exert autocrine, paracrine or endocrine effects on processes in the central nervous system and periphery), causing … Continue reading The Role of Obesity in Cognitive Decline and Alzheimer’s Disease

Aerobic Exercise May Reduce Brain Degeneration in Adults with Alzheimer’s Disease

Robust evidence from animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) maintains that aerobic exercise is a modifying treatment for AD. Human research, however, is limited with inconsistent findings. The present study demonstrates that aerobic exercise reduces the progression of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) and may reduce degeneration of the hippocampus in older adults with AD. The … Continue reading Aerobic Exercise May Reduce Brain Degeneration in Adults with Alzheimer’s Disease

Can we outsmart our own cognitive biases?

We are susceptible to cognitive biases, which cause us to overfocus on some kinds of information while disregarding other kinds. These flaws in our thinking can trick us into making wrong conclusions and decisions. Moreover, cognitive biases are highly implicated in the development of mental disorders. For example, attentional bias—hyperattention to a certain category of … Continue reading Can we outsmart our own cognitive biases?